Cystic Fibrosis

  • Home
  • /
  • Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis is a progressive, genetic disease that causes persistent lung infections and limits the ability to breathe over time and it affects the cells that produce mucus, sweat and digestive juices. It is caused by a change, or mutation, in a gene called CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). This gene controls the flow of salt and fluids in and out of the cells. The thick and sticky mucus associated with cystic fibrosis clogs the tubes that carry air in and out of the lungs. This can cause signs and symptoms such as persistent cough that produces thick mucus, wheezing, breathlessness, exercise intolerance, repeated lung infections, inflamed nasal passages or a stuffy nose. Cystic fibrosis is one of the leading causes of bronchiectasis, a condition that damages the airways and this makes it harder to move air in and out of the lungs and clear mucus from the airways. Overtime, lung function usually worsens gradually, and it eventually can become life-threatening.

 

  • COPD Conferences
  • ¬†Conferences on Lung Health
  • Meetings on Pulmonary Diseases
  • Pulmonology Conferences
  • Top COPD Conferences
  • Lung Health Conferences
  • World COPD Congress
  • Congress on COPD
  • COPD
  • Lung Diseases
  • ¬†Respiratory Diseases
  • Pulmonology

Subscribe